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Up First briefing: Biden at NATO; Tennessee trans care ban; Taylor Swift's 'Speak Now'

This will be President Biden's first meeting with King Charles since his coronation. The two men have met before, including at the UN climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, on Nov. 2, 2021.
Jane Barlow
/
AP
This will be President Biden's first meeting with King Charles since his coronation. The two men have met before, including at the UN climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, on Nov. 2, 2021.

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Today's top stories

President Biden is in London this morning to meet with British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak and King Charles III before heading to Lithuania's capital for the 74th NATO summit.

  • NPR's Asma Khalid says Ukraine will be the top priority at NATO. On Up First this morning, she says the question of the country's membership will be a big test for Biden, who recently told CNN that Ukraine isn't ready for membership. While Biden says it would be premature to call for a vote now, he's said the White House will lay out a path for membership — which he said would require some democratic reforms — and provide security guarantees if there's a cease-fire in the war with Russia.
  • Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy recently wrapped up his own tour of Europe, where he rallied support for Ukraine's NATO membership. His visit to Turkey led to the unexpected return of five former commanders that were key figures in last year's battle at the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol. Russia captured the commanders earlier in the war.

  • Many Ukrainians feel they've been in limbo since the possibility of NATO membership was broached in 2008, according to NPR's Greg Myre. He adds that they believe being in this "fuzzy middle ground" encouraged Russia to invade. Myre says Russia is very upset over the return of the commanders and says Turkey reneged on a deal to keep them until the end of the war.
  • The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has allowed a Tennessee law banning gender-affirming care for transgender youth to go into effect. It's the first time a federal court has allowed such a ban to take effect after it was blocked by lower courts. Judges in states like Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana and Kentucky have blocked similar bans. (via WPLN)

  • WPLN's Marianna Bacallao says the ruling "could bring this issue closer to the Supreme Court." The ruling is temporary, and the court has until the end of September to reach a final decision on whether the law will stay in effect while a lawsuit over the ban continues.
  • Areas of the South and Southwest are expected to see temperatures well above 100 degrees for several days this week. The National Weather Service has warned people in several cities, including Phoenix and Miami, to avoid the sun in the coming days.

  • "We're living in a new climate. The rules are different," climate journalist Jeff Goodell says on Morning Edition. Goodell says most people aren't taking heat seriously, and it's an issue that impacts everything from crops, livestock, the food supply and the spread of disease.
  • Today's listen

    Taylor Swift has rereleased her album, "Speak Now."
    Christopher Polk / Getty Images
    /
    Getty Images
    Taylor Swift has rereleased her album, "Speak Now."

    Taylor Swift released the highly anticipated Speak Now (Taylor's Version) last week. The new album is part of her project to rerecord new versions of all of her early songs so that she can get control of the master tapes. Swift was 19 when the original Speak Now was released. Vocal coach Justin Stoney analyzes how Swift's voice has matured now that she's 33 years old.

    I'm really into

    Coffee fruit up close. Each one is a bit smaller than a cherry tomato.
    / Lucas Neves
    /
    Lucas Neves
    Coffee fruit up close. Each one is a bit smaller than a cherry tomato.

    Do you savor your morning coffee or chug it just to stay awake? NPR production assistant Nic Neves has cousins who live, work and grow coffee in Brazil. His trips home helped him learn to appreciate his morning brew. To him, making his first cup of the day is like "performing a sacred ritual."

    What are you really into? Fill out this form or leave us a voice note at 800-329-4273, and part of your submission may be featured online or on the radio.

    3 things to know before you go

    An officer of the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) takes part in an operation against Amazon deforestation at an illegal mining camp, known as garimpo, at the Yanomami territory in Roraima State, Brazil, on February 24.
    Alan Chaves / AFP via Getty Images
    /
    AFP via Getty Images
    An officer of the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) takes part in an operation against Amazon deforestation at an illegal mining camp, known as garimpo, at the Yanomami territory in Roraima State, Brazil, on February 24.

  • Deforestation in the Amazon has dropped about 34% this year compared to the same period last year, according to Brazil's national government.
  • Elton John is hanging up his feather boa. After more than five decades of performing, he wrapped up the last concert in his farewell tour on Saturday.
  • "Elon Musk's Jet," an account that was suspended from Twitter last year for tracking where CEO Elon Musk's private jet flew, has joined rival app Threads.
  • This newsletter was edited by Majd Al-Waheidi.

    Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

    Suzanne Nuyen
    [Copyright 2024 NPR]
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